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Here is a Study Guide for the Final Exam

 

The exam is in two parts.  The exam is comprehensive.  Thus, material from the first exam will be available for review on the exam.

 

I.  One-third of the exam will involve identifying concepts and terms in persuasion.

 II.  The remainder of the exam will involve short answers in which you are asked to examine and illustrate concepts from class.

 Know the following matters.  Be prepared to apply concepts to explain examples of influence.

What is the role of emotional and fear appeals in persuasion?  When do they work and when do they not work?

What does the research say about the foot in the door technique versus the door in the face technique?

What is the role of humor in persuasion?

What are the elements of the sales process and what persuasion skills are emphasized most prominently in each?

What is the relative worth compliance gaining research that uses check sheet versus those that use actual composition of compliance gaining strategies?

What language elements seem to enhance persuasion and which ones seem to inhibit it?

What is the role of evidence in persuasive communication and what can be done to maximize its influence?

What audience characteristics moderate the effects of persuasive messages?

What are the major categories of nonverbal influence?  What nonverbal elements in each of these categories either enhance or inhibit persuasion?

What really are the influences of music, aroma, and subliminal persuasion on producing attitude change?

Of the matters covered in the special reports in class, what lessons about influence in persuasion can be most clearly drawn?

What are the major ways to measure attitudes and behaviors?

 

For review, here is the Study Guide Here is a Guide for the Midterm

  The exam is in two parts.

  I.  Twenty percent of the exam will involve identifying concepts and terms in persuasion.

  II.  The remainder of the exam will involve short answers in which you are asked to examine and illustrate concepts from class.

  Know the following matters.  Be prepared to apply concepts to explain examples of influence.

         What is persuasion, communication, propaganda, and coercion?

What are values and what is the role of values in persuasion?

What are Cialdini’s strategies of persuasion?

What are the major contributions of Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, and
          Bacon to the study of persuasion?

What are the major ways to measure attitudes?

What conditions must exist for the behavior to be predicted from
          attitudes?

What are the major theories of attitude change and how may they
          be applied to situations of influence?

Under what conditions does counterattitudinal advocacy produce
          self-persuasion?

What is credibility and what is ethos?

What elements contribute to credibility?

How may we build credibility?

How may credibility in leadership be acquired and maintained?

How may speeches be most persuasive organized and structured?