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Study Guide for 420 Final Exam

 for Spring 2007

For the remaining questions, you will be asked to use a modified “fill in the blanks” format. Thus, please bring a Scantron 882 form with you.

The final exam is comprehensive and includes material from the first part of the class. The following matters are new items to study for the final exam.

According to the tradition of general semantics, what are the sources of misunderstanding among people when they use language?

What is the difference between verbal and factual disputes and what kind of statements are involved in each form?

What are the categories of nonverbal cues covered in class? What is the role of each in communication?

What is expectancy violations theory and what does it predict about the use of space and touch by teachers?

What is sales and what is involved in the process of sales communication?

What are the major concepts and predictions derived from

Social judgment-involvement theory (including the concept of ego-involvement)?

               --according to this theory, how are highly ego-involved people persuaded?

              The elaboration likelihood model?

               --what type of message is most persuasive on each pathway to influence?

              Cognitive dissonance theory

               --when does cognitive dissonance work?

            Semiotics

Speech Codes theory

Interpersonal Deception Theory

Weick’s Information Systems Approach to Organizations

Gudykunst’s Anxiety/Uncertainty Management Theory

Semiotics

Speech Codes theory

Heider’s Balance theory

McLuhan’s technological determinism

Agenda setting theory

What are Cialdini’s influence strategies?

What is brainwashing and what are it major elements?

What are the dimensions of credibility and how may one increase credibility?

How may credibility be enhanced during the job interview?

What are the major elements of the theories presented in class reports?

What are the differences among attitude, beliefs, and values?

      

                                                  SPCH 420:  Communication Theory                                          S06

 

Instructor:  Dr. John Reinard                              Office:  CP Suite 420, Room 15

Phone:  278-7176                                               Office Hours:  M 2:30-3:30;  TTh 10:15-11:15am,

e-mail:  jreinard@fullerton.edu                            W 11:30am-12:30pm and by appointment

Class web page: http://commfaculty.fullerton.edu/jreinard

                                                                             

TEXTBOOK:  Em Griffin, A first look at communication theory (5th ed.).  Boston:  McGraw-Hill.

                         

COURSE OBJECTIVES:  The general survey course in communication theory is designed as a capstone experience that reviews the major areas of theory in the discipline.  Yet, communication studies represent such a diversity of approaches that the contemporary student must be conversant with theories that technically are from many fields.  In addition, to be competent to read the field's literature, one must have a working knowledge of the language of communication theory and related meta-theories that have stimulated interest.  In particular, this course seeks to meet four general purposes:

1.      to equip the you with a general knowledge of communication theory;

2.      to prepare you to select and use research to explain communication phenomena;

3.      to prepare you to evaluate existing communication theories and meta theories;

4.      to enhance your ability to develop persuasive scholarly arguments about theory.

 

COURSE FORMAT:  By use of electronic "slides," examples, and activities you will spend most class periods applying concepts you are learning.  The class requires active, not passive involvement.  Though, admittedly, lectures are a regular part of the course, knowledge necessary for your progress will be obtained though in-class contributions, class activities, text readings, and collateral assignments.  Thus, you must read assigned material before coming to class.  Moreover, this reading must be active and not passive.  You should be prepared to summarize positions taken in the book so that you can apply them in class.  Questions and issues should be raised during class and are welcomed since they often illuminate matters of concern for new students of research methods.  The instructor will not read the book for you in class, though questions and exercises based on the book will be included prominently.

 

EVALUATION:  In addition to theory, the class features a lot of "learning by doing" and examination of examples.  Thus, many activities contribute to your grade.  Specifically:

·   there will be a midterm exam that will count 25% toward your final grade;

·   a cumulative final exam will count 30%;

·   active (not passive) participation in class activities and completion of study sheet assignments will count 20%.  Some of these matters will be considered graded on a simple pass or fail basis (0% or 100%)and others involve work that is graded on an item by item basis.

·   a group oral and written report on a communication theory will count 25%.

Unexcused late written assignments will be penalized by 20% the first day and 10% each subsequent day.  Students who do not turn in an assignment will be presumed absent.  All assignments are graded on a percentage basis. 

 

The University grading system has adopted a system including plus and minus grades. For instance, an A- is computed as 3.7 grade points rather than a 4.0. Since this course has never been troubled by unrealistic grades, the plus and minus system for this class does not reflect an attempt to punish students. Instead, it corresponds to the university arrangement of scores. Hence, the following range of class cumulative grades will result in the following grades: 

96+ = A+;  88.5 to 95.9 = A;  86.5 to 88.4 = A-

83 to 86.4 = B+;  78.5 to 83.9 = B;  76.5 to 78.4 = B-

73 to 76.4 = C+;  68.5 to 72.9 = C;  66.5 to 68.4 = C-

63 to 66.4 = D+;  58.5 to 63.9 = D;  56.5 to 58.4 = D-

below 56.5 = F

Given that the course has a fair amount of "learning by doing," you cannot master the course by getting notes from friends.  If you are ill, have a personal emergency, or cannot attend due to a religious holiday, please leave a message on the professor's answering machine (278-7176) or in the main office (278-3617) before class.  Such delayed work will not be penalized if a telephone call is received before class, but the work generally must be completed after returning to class (check with the instructor regarding the specific assignment in question).  No late work may be turned in after the last regular session of class (prior to final exams).  No late assignments will be accepted on the day of the final exam.  Students must be in attendance to benefit from the class.  Unexcused absences are handled according to the separate policy statement.

 

POLICIES:  The following additional policies guide this course:

·         Plagiarism is cause for failing the class.  See the University Catalog for an official description and discussion of plagiarism.  Students may find it useful to study together.  Even so, worksheets that are turned in must not use same wording or examples.

·         On group written projects the group members collectively are responsible for assuring that all material is attributed accurately to original sources.

·         It is impermissible to look at, copy, or consult the work of another student or one’s books during a quiz or exam. It is impermissible to copy someone else’s written work, or allow someone else to copy yours.  Doing so constitutes plagiarism, which is punishable by expulsion. 

·         According to the University Catalog, grades of “incomplete” can be given only when a student who is doing otherwise acceptable work is unable to complete a course because of illness or other conditions beyond his or her control.  But any requirements to make up the course "shall not include retaking the course."  Not attending regularly, failing to complete assigned coursework, or just doing poorly in class is not cause for an incomplete grade.  Work must be completed during the time provided for the course.

·         By University regulation, following the University Census date, a class may not be dropped "except for the most serious reasons."  A serious reason is defined as "a physical, medical, emotional, or other condition which has the effect of limiting the student's full participation in the class."  According to the policy "the reasons must be documented by the student."  The policy states specifically that poor academic performance is not evidence of a serious reason for withdrawal.  The University does not accept a change in work schedule to justify a late withdrawal from classes.  Your instructor is willing to talk to your boss to help you secure a reasonable work schedule if it becomes necessary (at least let him help you).  Review of such documentation is completed by the instructor, the Department Chair and, if required, by the Dean of the School.

·         Students must be in attendance to benefit from the class.  Students who miss more than two unexcused class sessions will be subject to a lowering of their final cumulative grade by four full percentage points.  Additional days of unexcused absence may be penalized at the rate of an additional 2% per day.  Students will be excused from attendance due to personal illness, personal emergency, or observance of a religious holiday.  To be excused, students must telephone the instructor prior to the class sessions to be missed.

·        No late work or "extra credit" (whatever that means) assignments may be turned in after the last regular session of class (prior to the final exam).  The University will not permit “late completion of requirements” as a cause for changing a grade after the semester is completed.

 

PREPARATION OF WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS Assignments should be completed following accepted standards of American English and spelling.  Written work that fails to observe minimal standards of grammar and spelling will be returned to the student ungraded. 

 

The University Writing Center is available to CSUF students who need some additional help.  They are eager to help you with matters of grammar, clarity, punctuation, and the like.  But they are not in the business of editing your work before submission.  Furthermore, they will help you with your writing, but they will not help you do your class assignments.  To receive help on assignments and editing your papers, please talk to Dr. Reinard in advance of the due date for assignments.

 

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Please let the instructor know if you have a disability that might affect your participation or study in this class.  The instructor will keep this information in strict confidence, of course.  Often, however, immediate and simple steps can be taken by the instructor to improve your learning environment in this course.  Your instructor and Disabled Student Services will cooperate to help meet your needs.  If you have not yet contacted Disabled Student Services, you should do so very soon since they must first identify student-clients prior to offering their services.

 

INSTRUCTOR RESPONSIBILITIES

(1)       Coming to class prepared to teach the material, raise questions for discussion, and answer your questions.

(2)       Grading and returning your assignments within 10 days of receiving them.

(3)       Promptly notifying you of any revisions in the course schedule, or availability outside class.

 


 

Course Outline for Fifth Edition

 

DATE     TOPIC                                                                                                Readings

1-30        I.    Introduction to Communication Theory

A.                                     A.    Introduction to the Course: The Interdisciplinary Field

B.                           B.    Our Rhetorical Tradition

2-1                              (cont.)                                                                                                    chs 1, 3, 21

2-6                              (cont.)                                                                                                    chs 22, 23*

2-8/15              C.   What We Bring to the Communication Encounter:                              chs 10; Appendix A

                                Personalities, Motives, and Values                                             

2-22/3-8   II.   Interpersonal Communication
                         A. 
Communication Styles                                                                                ch. 12

3-13                 B.   Perception and Communication                                                             chs 8, ch 9

3-15/3-20        C.  Groupthink and Decision Making                                                            chs 16, 17*

3-22            Midterm Exam

4-3/5         III. Persuasion

                         A.  The Process of Influence and Attitude Change                                      chs 13-15

4-10                         (cont.)

4-12/4-17                            B.  Ethos and Alternative Strategies                                                

4-19/4-24        C.  Mass Media                                                                                               chs 24, 27, 28, 29*                       

4-26/5-1   IV. Languages

                         A.  Verbal Languages                                                                                    chs. 25, 32

5-3                   B.   Nonverbal Languages                                                                              chs 6, ch. 7*

5-8/5-10   V.  Settings:  Organizational and Intercultural  Applications                              chs 18, 30

5-15/5-17       Group Presentations                                                                       

5-22         FINAL EXAM  (12:00 – 1:50 pm)

 

This schedule is subject to change.  Nevertheless, topics listed will be introduced sometime during

the listed day.

 

*skim this reading


 

                                                    Course Outline for Sixth Edition

 

DATE     TOPIC                                                                                                Readings

1-30        I.    Introduction to Communication Theory

A.                                     A.    Introduction to the Course: The Interdisciplinary Field

B.                           B.    Our Rhetorical Tradition

2-1                              (cont.)                                                                                                    chs 1, 3, 22

2-6                              (cont.)                                                                                                    chs 23, 24*

2-8/15              C.   What We Bring to the Communication Encounter:                              chs 9; Appendix A

                                Personalities, Motives, and Values                                             

2-22/3-8   II.   Interpersonal Communication
                         A. 
Communication Styles                                                                                ch. 12

3-13                 B.   Perception and Communication                                                             chs 13, 8

3-15/3-20        C.  Groupthink and Decision Making                                                            chs 17, 18*

3-22            Midterm Exam

4-3/5         III. Persuasion

                         A.  The Process of Influence and Attitude Change                                      chs 14-16

4-10                         (cont.)

4-12/4-17                            B.  Ethos and Alternative Strategies                                                

4-19/4-24        C.  Mass Media                                                                                              Online chapter

                                                                                                                                                      (see page 357)

                                                                                                                                                   chs 27, 28                       

4-26/5-1   IV. Languages

                         A.  Verbal Languages                                                                                    chs. 25, 32

5-3                   B.   Nonverbal Languages                                                                              chs 6, ch. 7*

5-8/5-10   V.  Settings:  Organizational and Intercultural  Applications                              chs 19, 30

5-15/5-17       Group Presentations                                                                       

5-22         FINAL EXAM  (12:00 – 1:50 pm)

 

This schedule is subject to change.  Nevertheless, topics listed will be introduced sometime during

the listed day.

 

*skim this reading